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We often hear people say that once they move to Bayside, they never have a reason to leave, and it’s easy to see why.

The unique combination of lifestyle convenience, rich history, aesthetic charm and proximity to first-class amenities makes Bayside an enviable location for families and downsizers alike.

Lowe Living has a long and proud history of developing unique development sites in Melbourne’s most prestigious suburbs, enhancing residents’ lifestyles with thoughtful design and connection to the local beachside community.

A link to the past

From the iconic Brighton Bathing Boxes, built almost 150 years ago, to the nearby bluestone seawall holding markers from the graves of prisoners at the Old Melbourne Gaol, Bayside is remarkably steeped in history.

This link to the past lives on through many of Lowe Living’s thoughtful design elements, which celebrate the rich tapestry of the local area. For example, Lumiere Black Rock, home to six luxury residences, draws inspiration from the HMVS Cerberus wreck, in nearby Half Moon Bay. A curving facade and front fence, and gunmetal tapware and island benchtops, reflect the ship’s curved structure, while carefully selected sandstone materials talk to the rough edges of the seaside cliffs.

World class entertainment

A vibrant café and entertainment scene in Bayside’s residential pockets mean residents are often spoilt for choice, moments from home.

From the established eateries and main shopping strips in Brighton and Hampton, to the thriving café culture in Chelsea and Aspendale, these booming beachside hot spots have contributed to the changing dynamic of the suburbs that hug the curve of Port Phillip Bay. The revitalisation of the main streets of Mordialloc, Aspendale and Parkdale have led the way; previously regarded as ‘working class areas’, these beachside suburbs have transformed into aspirational destinations.

As restrictions ease, the broader community can look forward to an exciting program of arts and entertainment events throughout the year, such as the Mordialloc Food, Wine and Music Festival and the Bright ‘n Sandy Food and Wine Festival which draw crowds from across Melbourne, while the renowned Kingston Arts Centre continues to showcase the best of Australia’s established and emerging art talent.

For those seeking a quieter option, the iconic Palace Dendy Cinemas in Brighton, re-opening in July, remain a popular choice.

The great outdoors

While many are drawn to the calm, clear waters of Port Phillip Bay, perfect for swimming, boating and other water activities, or the classic facilities dotted along the stunning coastline, such as the Brighton Sea Baths (home to the much-loved ‘icebergers’) and the Black Rock Yacht Club, Bayside is home to a range of other health and wellness opportunities.

Celebrated coastal reserves, including Rickett’s Point Marine Sanctuary, provide the perfect opportunity to escape and explore, while several heathland sanctuaries throughout Bayside boast vegetation of local, regional and state significance to capture the imagination of both young and old.

Bayside City Council and the City of Kingston work collaboratively to ensure the beach and its facilities are accessible to everyone, with a range of initiatives, such as beach matting, floating wheelchairs and the ‘All Abilities Beach Day’, launched recently.

An aspirational lifestyle

With homes combining luxury with low maintenance living, Lowe Living residents are perfectly placed to embrace the aspirational lifestyle Bayside and its surrounding suburbs have to offer.

From the natural beauty to the endless amenity, life along the Port Phillip coastline is yours to enjoy.

Register your interest in our current Bayside projects Lumiere Black Rock, Azura Aspendale, La Sal Chelsea, or our upcoming projects in Brighton and Parkdale.

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*All data contained in this article is correct at time of publishing